How You Can Help

Right now, health care workers at Keck Medicine of USC’s hospitals and clinics have the gear they need to protect themselves and others as they care for patients with COVID-19. But with the number of COVID-19 patients rising daily, leaders at Keck Medicine are asking for the community’s help in donating supplies now.

  • Disposable face masks
  • N95 masks, sometimes called respirators
  • Eye protection, including face shields and safety goggles

  • Disposable gowns
  • Disposable gloves, especially non-latex
  • Disposable surgical caps

Keck Medicine is also accepting monetary donations to support our COVID-19 efforts.

Learn More
Give Now

COVID-19 Testing

Patients can access COVID-19 diagnostic tests. Your physician can order these tests for you, by appointment. Whether you are an existing patient or would like to become a patient, our team can help connect you with a Keck Medicine provider regarding COVID-19 testing. For assistance, please call (800) USC-CARE (800-872-2273).

All patients undergoing a surgery or procedure must get tested for COVID-19 within 72-24 hours prior to their surgery or procedure. We recommend being tested at a Keck Medicine facility to ensure a sufficient turnaround time. For details on pre-procedural testing, click here.

COVID-19 Testing Locations

Health Sciences Campus
2266 Norfolk St.
Los Angeles, CA 90033
Monday-Friday: 7:30 a.m. – 3:30 p.m.
Saturday-Sunday: 7:30 a.m. – 2 p.m.

Click here for a map of this location.

Arcadia – Multispecialty Clinic
125 W. Huntington Drive, Building C
Arcadia, CA 91007
Monday-Friday: 9 a.m. – 4 p.m.

Click here for additional information about this location.

Participate in COVID-19 Research

Our community of scientists is working diligently to better understand COVID-19 and is looking for people who have tested positive and recovered from the virus to take part in two projects:

  • USC COVID-19 Biorepository
  • USC COVID-19 Convalescent Serum Donation Project

Participants will be asked to donate biospecimens such as blood, urine and saliva.

To learn more about the projects and how to participate, click here.

COVID-19 DASHBOARD

Last updated: 8/12/20 at 3:00 p.m. Keck Hospital of USC USC Norris Cancer Hospital USC Verdugo Hills Hospital
Patients with confirmed COVID-19 currently in hospital 17 0 6

Keck Medicine COVID-19 Test Pricing

Keck Medicine Coronavirus (COVID-19) Diagnostic Lab Test Coronavirus (COVID-19) Viral Test Coronavirus (COVID-19) Antibody Test
Simple Description This is a viral test that indicates if you currently have the coronavirus infection. This is an antibody test that indicates if you previously had the coronavirus infection.
Test Description Molecular (RT-PCR) test to diagnose SARS-CoV-2 infection (COVID-19). This is publicized as the “swab” test. Antibody (serology) test to detect antibodies to SARS-CoV-2 that provide indication that you have been exposed to the virus.
When To Get Tested When you have symptoms of SARS-CoV-2 infection and/or have been exposed to someone with the virus. When you previously had, or suspected you had, COVID-19 and your health care provider wants to determine if you have antibodies to the virus.
Keck Medicine Cash Price $114 $115

Our Frontline Team

A look at the members of our health care team as they work to protect our
patients and community during the COVID-19 pandemic

Frequently Asked Questions

Your health and safety are our top priorities. Our physicians and staff are here for you when you need care — via a virtual telehealth visit or in one of our offices or hospitals. To learn more about how we are providing safe, effective care, click here.

Virtual visits allow you and your physician to share information using a video connection. In order to have a virtual visit with one of our physicians, you must have an internet connection as well as USC’s TeleCARE platform installed on your computer or smartphone. For instructions on how to install the USC TeleCARE platform on your computer or smartphone, click here.

To view the USC TeleCARE Patient User Guide, click here.

The health of our patients is always our top priority. In light of ongoing concerns surrounding COVID-19, we are taking precautionary steps to ensure the well-being of our patients, staff and visitors.

To view our current hospital visitors policy, click here.

At this critical time, Keck Medicine is asking qualified physicians who are not currently providing clinical care to supplement our current physician workforce, in anticipation of a surge of seriously ill coronavirus patients. If you’re available to help, click here.
Effective immediately, vendors and all other non-essential visitors will not be granted access to our facilities. All meetings scheduled with vendors should take place virtually, via teleconference or on platforms such as Zoom or Microsoft Teams. In-person meetings with vendor representatives should not take place, including appointments with medical device representatives.

Important Information From the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

Below are answers to frequently asked questions about COVID-19 from the CDC. For the complete FAQ list, click here.

A novel coronavirus is a new coronavirus that has not been previously identified. The virus causing coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), is not the same as the coronaviruses that commonly circulate among humans and cause mild illness, like the common cold.

A diagnosis with coronavirus 229E, NL63, OC43, or HKU1 (these are commonly circulating coronaviruses) is not the same as a COVID-19 diagnosis. Patients with COVID-19 will be evaluated and cared for differently than patients with common coronavirus diagnosis.

The virus that causes COVID-19 is thought to spread mainly from person to person, mainly through respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs or sneezes. These droplets can land in the mouths or noses of people who are nearby or possibly be inhaled into the lungs. Spread is more likely when people are in close contact with one another (within about 6 feet).

COVID-19 seems to be spreading easily and sustainably in the community (“community spread”) in many affected geographic areas. Community spread means people have been infected with the virus in an area, including some who are not sure how or where they became infected.

Learn what is known about the spread of newly emerged coronaviruses.

The virus that causes COVID-19 is spreading from person-to-person. People are thought to be most contagious when they are symptomatic (the sickest). That is why the CDC recommends that these patients be isolated either in the hospital or at home (depending on how sick they are) until they are better and no longer pose a risk of infecting others. More recently the virus has also been detected in asymptomatic persons.

How long someone is actively sick can vary so the decision on when to release someone from isolation is made using a test-based or non-test-based strategy (i.e. time since illness started and time since recovery) in consultation with state and local public health officials. The decision involves considering the specifics of each situation, including disease severity, illness signs and symptoms, and the results of laboratory testing for that patient.

Learn more about the CDC’s guidance on when to release someone from isolation and discharge hospitalized patients with COVID-19. For information on when someone who has been sick with COVID-19 is able to stop home isolation see Interim Guidance for Discontinuation of In-Home Isolation for Patients with COVID-19.

Someone who has been released from isolation is not considered to pose a risk of infection to others.

It is not yet known whether weather and temperature impact the spread of COVID-19. Some other viruses, like the common cold and flu, spread more during cold weather months, but that does not mean it is impossible to become sick with these viruses during other months. At this time, it is not known whether the spread of COVID-19 will decrease when weather becomes warmer. There is much more to learn about the transmissibility, severity and other features associated with COVID-19, and investigations are ongoing.

Visit the CDC’s COVID-19 Prevention and Treatment page to learn about how to protect yourself from respiratory illnesses, like COVID-19.

In light of new data about how COVID-19 spreads, along with evidence of widespread COVID-19 illness in communities across the country, the CDC recommends that people wear a cloth face covering to cover their nose and mouth in the community setting. This is an additional public health measure people should take to reduce the spread of COVID-19 in addition to (not instead of) social distancing, frequent hand cleaning and other everyday preventive actions. A cloth face covering is not intended to protect the wearer, but may prevent the spread of virus from the wearer to others. This would be especially important in the event that someone is infected but does not have symptoms. A cloth face covering should be worn whenever people must go into public settings (grocery stores, for example). Medical masks and N-95 respirators are reserved for healthcare workers and other first responders, as recommended by current CDC guidance.

People with COVID-19 have had a wide range of symptoms reported — ranging from mild symptoms to severe illness. Symptoms may appear 2-14 days after exposure to the virus. People with these symptoms may have COVID-19:

  • Fever or chills
  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath or difficulty breathing
  • Fatigue
  • Muscle or body aches
  • Headache
  • New loss of taste or smell
  • Sore throat
  • Congestion or runny nose
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Diarrhea

This list does not include all possible symptoms. The CDC will continue to update this list as they learn more about COVID-19.

Read more about COVID-19 symptoms.

Maybe; not everyone needs to be tested for COVID-19.

If you have symptoms of COVID-19 and want to get tested, call your health care provider first.

You can also visit your state or local health department’s website to look for the latest local information on testing. See Test for Past Infection for more information.

We do not know yet if people who recover from COVID-19 can get infected again. The CDC and its partners are investigating to determine if a person can get sick with COVID-19 more than once. Until we know more, continue to take steps to protect yourself and others.

  • Tom Jackiewicz, CEO of Keck Medicine of USC

A Message From Tom Jackiewicz, Keck Medicine CEO

March 20, 2020 We are living under extraordinary circumstances that have upended our day-to-day routine at home, work, in our community and around the globe. We are having to continually