Coronavirus Vaccine | Keck Medicine of USC

Coronavirus Vaccine2021-06-14T11:10:50-07:00

COVID-19 Vaccine Information

Vaccines are crucial tools in the fight against deadly infectious diseases. When the COVID-19 vaccine becomes available to you, we strongly encourage that you receive it.

Vaccine Rollout at Keck Medicine of USC

Keck Medicine is working diligently to coordinate the rollout of COVID-19 vaccines to our patients, in adherence with supply availability and guidelines from the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health (LAC DPH), California Department of Public Health (CADPH) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

How to Schedule an Appointment

You can book your appointment via California’s statewide system, My Turn.

GO TO MY TURN

As of May 15, we will be administering vaccines to people 14 or older at Keck Medical Center of USC.

You must present proof of age when checking in for your appointment, such as a driver’s license, state ID card or birth certificate. If you cannot provide proof of age, you will need to reschedule your appointment until you have the required documents.

If you are under age 18, you must be accompanied at all vaccination appointments by a parent or guardian. The parent or guardian will be asked onsite to provide both written and verbal consent for the vaccination.

To reduce crowding on the day of your appointment, please arrive no more than 30 minutes prior to your appointment time. If you arrive more than 30 minutes before your appointment time, you will be asked to wait in your vehicle.

COVID-19 Vaccine Location

Keck Medicine currently offers COVID-19 vaccinations at one location.

Norris Healthcare Center (HC3)
1516 San Pablo St.
Los Angeles, CA 90033

Click here for a map of this location.

Frequently Asked Questions

In clinical trials for vaccines produced by pharmaceutical companies Pfizer and Moderna, participants did not experience any life-threatening events that were attributed to the vaccine. Keck Medicine will continue to monitor data as it becomes available.

Viruses constantly change through mutation, and multiple COVID-19 mutations are circulating around the world. New variants, such as those recently identified in the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom and South Africa, appear to spread more easily. Scientists are working to learn more about whether these mutations are changing the effectiveness of the COVID-19 vaccine.

Yes. In clinical trials, the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines were highly effective in preventing severe illness from COVID-19, but more studies need to be conducted to determine vaccine efficacy in real-world conditions.
Clinical trials of the COVID-19 vaccines currently being administered in the U.S. show that they are highly effective at preventing severe illness from COVID-19. After getting vaccinated with the second dose, however, it can take a few weeks for the body to build maximum immunity to the coronavirus. While your body is building its defenses, it is possible to contract the virus that causes COVID-19. The CDC recommends that you continue to follow safety measures, including wearing a mask, washing your hands and maintaining physical distance, after you have been vaccinated.
The following groups should delay receiving the COVID-19 vaccine at this time:

  • Those allergic to specific ingredients in the vaccines (most notably polyethylene glycol)
  • Those who have had acute COVID-19 infection in the last 90 days
  • Those who received monoclonal antibody for COVID-19 in the last 90 days
  • Those who have received any other vaccination in the last 14 days

People who have had past anaphylactic reactions to vaccines or injection medications should talk with their primary care physician before receiving the vaccination. If they choose to receive it, they will be monitored for 30 minutes after receipt.

If you have ever had a severe allergic reaction to any ingredient in a COVID-19 vaccine, the CDC recommends that you should not get that vaccine. You can find the ingredients and more information on the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine and the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine on the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) website.

If you have had a severe allergic reaction to other vaccines or injectable therapies, ask your doctor if you should get a COVID-19 vaccine. Your doctor will help you decide if it is safe for you to get vaccinated.

People with a history of severe allergic reactions not related to vaccines or injectable medications — such as allergies to food, pets, venom, environments or latex — may still get vaccinated.

People with a history of allergies to oral medications or a family history of severe allergic reactions, or who might have a milder allergy to vaccines (without anaphylaxis) — may also still get vaccinated.

Some physical side effects are normal after receiving the vaccine. People may experience inflammation at the injection site, fever, headaches, muscle pain and body aches. These symptoms are more frequent after the second dose. The symptoms typically resolve within 1-2 days. Learn more about vaccine side effects.
You can book your appointment via California’s statewide system, My Turn.
A text message confirming your scheduled appointment(s) will be sent to your phone. You can also use the myUSCchart patient portal to view your future appointments and add them to your calendar.

No. Currently, Keck Medicine offers vaccines produced by Pfizer and Moderna. Patients are not able to choose which vaccine they receive at this time.

No. The Pfizer and Moderna vaccines are mRNA-based — essentially a code that tells the body to make protein that will generate an immune response. That protein alone is not the virus, so it won’t trigger a positive test result.

It’s important in some diseases, like COVID-19, to prime the body to get an optimal immune response. The first dose primes the immune system — prepares the body to respond appropriately to the next dose and form antibodies. That first dose helps ensure a robust immune response that will get coded into the memory cells in the body. These are the cells we will rely on when we see COVID-19 the next time around.

As of right now, we understand that the vaccine produces a robust immune response for at least 3 months; however, as time goes by, we will learn more.

Yes, people should still wear masks, even after receiving the vaccine. Until we learn more about the protection COVID-19 vaccines provide under real-life conditions, it will be important for everyone to continue wearing a mask, washing hands often and staying at least 6 feet away from others.

In adherence with guidelines from the CDC, all people age 2 and older should wear a face mask while out in a public setting and/or among people who do not live in their household. When wearing a face mask, it should be close-fitted and cover your nose and mouth. Currently, the CDC recommends that N-95 respirators and other medical-grade masks be reserved for use by health care professionals. To learn more about face masks, click here.

The CDC’s Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists have recommended that pregnant people should not be limited from receiving COVID-19 vaccines.

In addition, preliminary research published in the New England Journal of Medicine suggests that COVID-19 mRNA vaccines, such as those produced by Pfizer and Moderna, appear to be relatively safe when administered to people who are pregnant. This research also found that pregnant people experienced side effects similar to those in people who were not pregnant.

People who are pregnant are at increased risk for severe illness from COVID-19. If you have concerns, talk to your primary care doctor to weigh the risks and benefits of the vaccine versus COVID-19 infection.

Current evidence shows that people whose immune systems are compromised may be more at risk for severe COVID-19. The most recent COVID-19 vaccine guidelines from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) state that people who are immunocompromised may receive the vaccine if they do not have any contraindications to vaccination. People who are immunocompromised should speak to their doctor about the risks and benefits of vaccination, including the potential for a decreased response to the vaccine.

While the most recent COVID-19 vaccine guidelines from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) do not directly address people with cancer, they state that people who are immunocompromised (such as people undergoing cancer treatment) may receive the vaccine if they do not have any contraindications to vaccination. If you are receiving cancer treatment, you should review the risks and benefits of vaccination — including the potential for a decreased response to the COVID-19 vaccine — with your doctor.

According to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), there is no clear evidence that the vaccine causes Bell’s palsy, a condition that causes weakness or paralysis of facial muscles. If you have a history of Bell’s palsy, talk to your primary care doctor to discuss your options. Keck Medicine will continue to monitor data in this area.

Transplant recipients are at increased risk for severe illness from COVID-19. Talk to your primary care doctor or specialist to weigh the risks and benefits of the vaccine versus COVID-19 infection.

The Pfizer and Moderna vaccines require a cold-chain distribution system to transport and store them. Keck Medicine has developed these systems, including securing 6 specialty freezers for this purpose.

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