Dr. Chen is a spine and brain tumor surgeon at the USC Department of Neurological Surgery of Keck Medicine of USC.

Here’s what you won’t find on his resume:

He never thought of being anything but a doctor.

“Growing up, my parents were my biggest role models. They helped me set my goals to become a doctor. I originally applied to medical school because I never thought of doing anything else. I love being a doctor so much that I’ve never even thought of changing places with anyone.”

One day he will travel the world.

“I love to travel in my free time. My favorite travel destination is Hawaii. There are three things I still have yet to check off my bucket list. I want to take a trip around the world, write a few books on neurosurgery and motivation and create new companies focused on treatment of central nervous system diseases.”

He is a beacon of hope.

“The best piece of advice I have ever received was when I was told, ‘Don’t give up.’ My patients depend on me and they come to me with severe complications, such as spine and brain tumors. The advice was so profound to me that I share it with my patients as well.”

He’s a master multitasker.

“The most challenging part of my day is that it is only 24 hours long. There just aren’t enough of hours in the day to get everything I want to get done finished. I prioritize treating patients, but I also have to continue working on translational research and coming up with new treatments that are currently in clinical trials for brain tumor patients.”

The end result motivates him.

“The most rewarding part of my career is doing a surgery for a brain tumor patient because of the life-changing results that a patient experiences afterwards.”

Keck Medicine of USC gives him autonomy.

“I love working at Keck Medicine of USC because we work in a team environment and it is just the right size. What sets us apart is how personalized our care is and our advanced treatment regiments. The reason I chose to work at an academic medical center was so that I could have the freedom to do research within the field.

He’s a part of the future of his field.

“Currently, I’m involved in a nasal brain delivery clinical trial for gliomas (A type of tumor that occurs in the brain and spinal cord). This could potentially revolutionize the treatment for brain tumors. Chemo can be inhaled through the nose, while at rest, opposed to being injected in the veins. One day I hope we can work towards a cure for brain cancer.”

Dr. Chen is the professor of neurological surgery. Click here to view Dr. Chen’s full biography.

Click here to learn more about the USC Department of Neurological Surgery.