Dr. Randleman is the director of cornea, external Disease and refractive surgery service at the USC Eye Institute of Keck Medicine of USC.

Here’s what you won’t find on his resume:

He takes his camera everywhere.

“When I’m away from ophthalmology I likely have a camera in my hand. One blessing of my work is the ability to combine three things I love dearly: ophthalmology, education and travel.

My speaking schedule has offered unique opportunities to see various places all over the world, and I have lectured in more than 20 countries accross five continents. I love traveling to new, unique destinations, especially those that are particularly photogenic. I have been enamored with photography for about 10 years and find it to be a wonderful outlet.

When traveling, photography gets me out of the hotel to see new places ranging from cities to the countryside in their very best light. It has taught me patience.”

There are three places he has yet to photograph.

“There are a few travel destinations still on my bucket list. I’m sure my bucket list will evolve over time, but today most, if not all, of my items include photogenic travel destinations. I have never seen Petra, the Great Wall of China, or Macchu Pichu — I hope to visit all those soon!”

Athletics kept him motivated through school.

“I was a relatively mainstream athlete in high school and college, playing a variety of high school sports and college football. However, after I stopped playing football, I got involved with competitive powerlifting and even set a couple of records in the deadlift in drug-free collegiate divisions. Those days are long gone now…

He is in love with his work.

“I truly love my work so I find many aspects of my job to be rewarding. I am blessed with the opportunity to restore a patient’s vision that has deteriorated from cataracts, or help patients achieve high-quality vision without the need for glasses or contacts with LASIK and related refractive procedures. I am also able to improve patient’s quality of life in those with corneal disorders. As the editor-in-chief of the Journal of Refractive Surgery, I get to review the very latest research products firsthand before the rest of the field sees them. It requires diligence to sort the innovative submissions from the ‘too good to be true’ submissions, but this work really keeps me at the forefront of my subspecialty.”

He has his eyes on the future of the industry.

“Corneal cross-linking is a relatively new procedure that has revolutionized the treatment for a particular corneal disorder, keratoconus. This has the potential to partially reverse the effects of corneal warpage and vision distortion from this disease. It has the potential to open up a wide array of treatment options for these patients where few existed before. We are at the forefront of this technology at the USC Roski Eye Institute.”

He would like this discovery to benefit everyone.

“The restoration of accommodation, more commonly known as reading vision, is the holy grail of ophthalmology, as the loss of reading vision affects nearly all people over time, surgeons included! We have developed a variety of options to combat this problem and have different options for different patients available today at Keck Medicine of USC, but the full reversal of this problem would be wonderful.”

The reason he chose Keck Medicine of USC.

“There are so many areas in science, education and medicine that are rewarding and benefit the lives of patients, including clinical care, surgery, research and educating today’s surgeons and the next generation of physicians. However, an academic medical center is the only place where a physcian can have a balanced focus on all of these areas. It is constantly rewarding to bring new treatments and findings to light through research, and to be able to immediately pass this information along to residents, fellows and medical students. I could not envision my career any other way.”

Keck Medicine of USC is his new home.

“Having just joined the faculty, I am amazed with the dedication to and support for innovation here! There is a tangible focus on the future to benefit patients and move our field forward, which is refreshing and stimulating.

Ophthalmology has a long, proud tradition at Keck Medicine of USC and has been a recognized national leader for more than 20 years. We are blessed with a dynamic clinical and research faculty and wonderful residents and fellows. The proximity to LA County facilities really benefits the educational experience here and sets us apart form most other medical centers. That focus balanced with community outreach throughout Los Angeles allows us to fulfill our mission to provide the best eye care in the region.”

Dr. Randleman is a professor of clinical ophthalmology. Click here to view Dr. Randleman’s full biography. Click here to learn more about the USC Eye Institute.